Author Archives: Randy Ehle

Abortion: A Mixed Review

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This photo was taken by Kjetil Ree.
© 2007 Kjetil Ree, some rights reserved
.

The U.S. Supreme Court today, by a 5-4 majority, struck down Roe v. Wade, nearly 49 years after the decision that declared a woman’s constitutional right to an abortion. I honestly never thought I’d see this day.

There was a time I would have celebrated this history-making decision. Not today. Today I am conflicted. Some background ….

I first became aware of Roe v. Wade when I studied it for a ninth-grade social studies paper, way back when the ruling itself was just seven years old. I remember the struggle I had then, long before Operation Rescue (founded in 1986); before anti-abortion zealots began to physically block access to abortion providers; before some of those zealots decided it was somehow okay, even morally right, to bomb the clinics and murder the medical professionals who performed abortions. (So much for “pro-life.”)

I remember the struggle I had as I researched and wrote that paper: my Christian faith told me that God values life over death; my reasonably-intelligent scientific study told me that an embryo growing in a womb is not merely “potential life” but real, actual, living life; the combination of faith and science told me that ending such life is, indeed, killing. These convictions led me to oppose abortion; I thought it was wrong, violating my faith, social mores, and even the Hippocratic Oath taken by physicians for nearly two thousand years. I wanted Roe v. Wade to be the rule of the land.

Yet at the same time, I struggled to understand the constitutional justification for the decision. The Court held that a woman had a right to privacy under the Fourteenth Amendment; I didn’t see that—but of course I was even less a constitutional scholar than scientist; that right to privacy had been affirmed by the Court eight years before Roe. It seemed to me that, if anything, the state (and the constitution) had a duty to protect its citizens—including the unborn; yet the unborn were not citizens, as near as I could tell; one has to be born in the U.S. to be a citizen, or at least be born to a U.S. citizen. But certainly the state had a duty to protect persons, and I believed then (and still do) that an unborn child is a person. (Numerous courts have apparently agreed with this, convicting individuals of not one but two murders when a pregnant woman and her unborn baby were killed.)

In the end, my paper followed the weak logic of a high school freshman: I argued my case against Roe v. Wade in spite of my inability to find legitimate constitutional grounds.

Four decades later, I don’t like abortion any more than I did as a high schooler. I’m a little smarter, though, and wiser; I’m more forgiving, and far less a black-and-white, either/or thinker. I may even be a little less judgmental, at least in some aspects. (Still working on that.) In numerous ways, my perspectives have shifted, broadened, grown. It’s become easier—though not always easy—to say I’m wrong, or was wrong, or may be wrong. I’ve wrestled more with inconsistencies in both my own and others’ thinking and philosophies.

I also recognize—and fear—the cultural milieu into which this new Supreme Court ruling comes, the great divides in these United States that have grown in terrifying ways over even just the last few years. And it’s not just division, but divisiveness—active, intentional, and often violent efforts to create or widen those divides.

Those who oppose abortion are celebrating today, thinking they have won a victory for life. If they are truly pro-life, let them show it by loving, supporting, and helping women in what might be the most difficult decision of their life—even if they disagree with the decision. I fear, though, that too many who declare themselves to be “pro-life” are truly more “anti-abortion,” incapable of offering that kind of love and support.

I fear the worst in our society: that women will again be subject to terror and brutality, whether on an operating table or not; that the violence of the abortion debate in the 1980s and ’90s will return.

And so today I do not celebrate the Supreme Court’s decision. Today I grieve the violence and division in our nation, and pray for her unity.

Why Jan 6 Matters

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Not even during the Civil War was the Confederate Flag brought into the U.S. Capitol.
Photo from NBC News. Click on photo for the article.

Recently I’ve read on social media the suggestion that the events of Jan 6, 2021, have less of an impact on our day-to-day lives than the price we are paying for gas (and, by extension, other prices).

May I suggest a longer view? We’ve been through economic slumps before. We’ve experienced “out of control” inflation before. I’m old enough to remember gas prices around $1 a gallon … and lines stretching around the block to buy gas (ironically, those were around the same era). I also remember paying the equivalent of $4-5 a gallon—around the same time (forty years ago)—in West Germany.

You know what? We survived. We survived the energy crisis of the 1970s. We survived the burst of the housing bubble. We survived the “crash” of 2008. We even survived the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl. We can survive the current economic challenges (and yes, they are many).

What I don’t remember—because it hasn’t happened, certainly not in my lifetime—is an armed incursion of the U.S. Capitol by not just a few, but hundreds of “Americans” (I use the term loosely). There have been small-scale attacks, including at least two bombs (1971 and 1983). There was, it is believed, an attempted attack on 9/11/2001. But there has been nothing on the scale of what we saw on January 6 last year. In fact, I believe you have to go back to 1814 to find anything comparable—the burning of the Capitol. And that was done by a foreign force, not our nation’s own citizens.

The very survival of the United States of America has never been truly threatened by the price of gas or milk or wheat.

Two world wars did not threaten her survival as a nation. Yes, the Cold War with its nuclear arms race was a legitimate threat—a threat to the entire world, though, not just the US.

The only legitimate threat to our survival as a nation has come from the inside: the Civil War 160 years ago and, a year ago, the incursion into the U.S. Capitol. Regardless of who may have instigated that event—whether grass roots or the very top—the aim of mob was nothing less than the overthrow of democracy, and the assassination of the Vice President. (How else can one understand the chant, “Hang Mike Pence,” while a gallows and a noose were waiting outside?) What’s worse, it was all done in the name of democracy.

I don’t like paying nearly $7 a gallon for gas. But I’ll take that any day if I can live in a truly democratic republic: a nation in which the law rules, and the people—for all our faults and failures and disagreements—get to be part of making, changing, and unmaking that law. Even the laws I don’t like.

Does Jan 6, 2021 matter? More than the short-sighted want to admit.

Grief

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Robert E. Ehle • 1936–2022

My dad died last Saturday. It was expected, and so completely not expected. Six years ago he had three major surgeries; recovery from the last one took a full year. Last May he was diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis, which can be treated but not cured. The doctor said he’s had patients live five years with that. I learned in February that a few months earlier, Dad was given a year to eighteen months to live. So in a very real sense, I’ve been expecting this for six years … and a year … and three months. But still ….

There is a loneliness in grief, the reality that even when surrounded by loving, caring people who are doing everything right to offer support, none can know truly what I am feeling, how I am grieving. Even those who have known deep grief cannot know my grief. There are common aspects of grief, common stages; yet there can be no truly common grief.

And so we grieve alone, even in the midst of other grievers—others who have experienced the same loss.

And yet there is One who not only grieved His own loss, but whose omniscience allows Him to know the deepest solitude of my loss—One who truly can, and does, grieve with me … and in whose comforting presence I do not grieve alone.

Rise Again—An Easter Lament

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He is risen! He is risen indeed! And yet….

Death rains and reigns.
Evil dances.
Lies cry out.
And still He waits.

Your time is perfect,
Your grace severe,
Your patience intolerable

As children die
Women raped
Men slaughtered

A bike lies fallen
Bodies draped with sheets
Cars become tombs

How many more will die
Before one more is saved for eternity?

And where are Your people?
Who will cry out “PEACE! STOP!”?
Who will sacrifice for war to end?
When will the world arise?

Are we so terrified of the killing machines we ourselves have created that we will allow thousands more to die, to be raped, maimed, orphaned, before we will say with our lives, “ENOUGH!”?

And what of my own hypocrisy?

Yes, I care more for the thousands in Ukraine
than the thousands in Syria.

Forgive me, Gracious Father.

Aleppo broke your heart as much as Mariupol.
Or more, for its forgottenness in the world.

Let my heart break for
the widows
the orphans
the immigrants and refugees
the poor
wherever they are
whatever their skin or homeland or language or faith

Rise again, LORD Jesus
On this Easter morning.
Won’t you rise and bring death to its end

Judge the world
Strike down the brute
In the palace or the tent … or my own heart

LORD Sabaoth, LORD of Hosts
Bring an end to the reign of terror
Let the generals rise up against their commander
Let the privates lay down their arms
Let the officers and the sergeants end the atrocities

Reveal yourself as God of justice and wrath
…and grace

Rise again, my Lord and my God.

Ukraine

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A storm of thoughts and emotions is swirling inside me as I take in the news from Ukraine. Somewhere in my family history, on my mom’s side, we have roots in Ukraine—not a strong or deep connection, but it’s there.

Stronger is the pull from the four years I invested in the U.S. Air Force, fighting the Cold War that helped buy Ukraine’s freedom and independence from the oppression of the Soviet Union. Stationed in England, I took the Soviet threat seriously: we knew their missiles were pointed at us; a U.S. missile base was both built and decommissioned in the space of those four years, just eight miles from where I was stationed; F-5E fighter jets, painted and trained as Soviet fighters, were among the aircraft assigned to my base, flying to train western air forces in air-to-air combat. (The 527th Tactical Fighter Training Aggressor Squadron was the Air Force’s version of the Navy’s better-known Top Gun Fighter Weapons School.)

Some say the Cold War was a war of words—but they were words backed up by very real weapons, many of them nuclear. Those were scary times. Between the rhetoric and the propaganda (on both sides) and the missiles, life—particularly in Europe—was lived under a threatening cloud known as MAD: “mutually-assured destruction.” Our hope was vested in leaders on both sides who were reasonable enough to long for, and work for, a greater peace.

We won that war, that Cold War. Reason prevailed. Treaties were signed. Missiles dismantled. Oppressed citizens were empowered to rise against their oppressors to demand freedoms they’d never known. It wasn’t easy; change … transformation … never is. The pull back to what is known, what is comfortable—even oppression—is great. (I think of the ancient Israelites who, in the heat of the wilderness, yearned to go back to the familiar slavery in Egypt.) But the pull to something better won out, and throughout Eastern Europe, men and women endured the discomfort of change for the sake of their children and grandchildren.

Yet always there is someone who wants to go back, who misses the power that would have been, could have been, theirs under the old regime. They proclaim strength and freedom and prosperity. They decry the hard work of real freedom, they bemoan the discomfort of real transformation, they blame the present sufferings on the future hope. And their sweet words entice even reasonable men and women to offer up even their own power and freedom on an altar to evil.

History is repeating itself. Again. At what cost? Will Ukraine become the first casualty of a war for a new Soviet Union or will the invasion be crushed by a global coalition as happened in Kuwait in 1991? Will the world be drawn into a third Great War or is this, as some suggest, the biblical Armageddon—truly the War to end all wars?

Pray for peace. Fight for freedom. Silence the evil